6866 Main St., Wilmington, NC 28405
910-679-4257 or 484-885-3037

Monday – Saturday 10am – 7pm
Sunday 12 – 6pm
& By Appointment

Current Exhibits

View the most recent Virtual Tour in the gallery by Matterhorn Media!

Exhibit Date :: December 4, 2022 - January 8, 2023
Opening Reception: Sunday, December 4, 3-5pm
In Gallery & Online
“Moments: Photography by Carlos Flores” Exhibt

Moments: Photography by Carlos Flores” on view in the gallery from December 4th until January 8, 2023. Carlos states that “Life is nothing but an infinite number of moments that are in constant motion. Unfortunately, it’s quite impossible to remember it all. My camera is my greatest tool because with it I’m able to collect and store passing moments that become memories to later reminisce. It gives me great honor to share those with you. Moments.”

Carlos Flores is a contemporary photographer and filmmaker who was born in El Salvador and immigrated to the United States at the early age of two. In 2017, he discovered his passion for film photography. Ever since then, Carlos has been passionate about capturing moments to show the world what he sees through his lens.

Click here for a preview of the work that will appear in this exhibit! 

His photography has been displayed at The ArtWorks Gallery Verrazzano, Gravity Records, Leland Cultural Arts Center, Leland Town Hall, Arts on Fire, and Art in Bloom Gallery.

Gallery events are always free and open to the public. On view along with these exhibits, Art in Bloom Gallery showcases a plethora of fine art of over local 30 artists.  The gallery is open Monday – Saturday 10am – 6pm and Sunday 12-6pm and is now located in Mayfaire Town Center at 6866 Main Street in Wilmington, NC.

 

Exhibit Date :: November 10, 2022 - January 8, 2023
Opening Reception: Thursday, November 10, 5-8pm
In Gallery & Online
“Collaborating with Nature: Fiber Art with Rebecca Yeomans” Exhibit

“Natural Beauty Pageant” Fiber Art with Eco Printing and stitching, 40″H x 46.25″W

Collaborating with Nature investigates the intricate fiber art pieces created by Rebecca Yeomans. Rebecca’s current work combines botanical printing, knitting, and stitching with a painterly feel. She is a full-time artist residing with her family in Wilmington, N.C.

Rebecca Yeomans has lived her entire life centered around making. She learned to knit at eight years old and was considered the “class artist” in school. She studied studio art at UNC-Chapel Hill, receiving a BFA in 1974. After earning an MFA from Auburn University in 1979 she taught there for several years. Rebecca and her husband Tom moved to Wilmington, NC in 1984 and she worked as a scenic artist in the film industry. She was a founding board member for DREAMS of Wilmington and later taught classes. Her fiber jewelry can be seen at the CAM gift shop. After she and Tom raised two artsy daughters, Rebecca quickly moved into full time artist mode. Her current work combines botanical printing, knitting, and stitching with a painterly feel.

Join us in the gallery on Thursday, November 10th from 5-8pm for a special Opening Reception for this body of work! On view along with this exhibit is Art Made with Light: Photograms by Melissa Wilgis.

Click here for a preview of the work that will appear in this exhibit! 

About the Process

The botanical printmaking process is almost always the inspiration and starting point for my work. Eco or botanical printing is the art of transferring color from natural plant material on to fabric or paper using pressure, moisture, and heat. Beautiful contact plant portraits are captured by bundling vegetation and fabric, either by rolling around a pipe or stacking in layers and binding tightly. The bundle is then steamed or immersed in simmering natural dye coaxing the pigment out of the leaves and on to the cloth. Results depend on many variables: type of fabric, water source, plant species, season, climate, and type of vessel used to name a few. Thus each piece is unique and always a surprise. The process involves many steps: scouring, mordanting, pre dyeing, printing with plant material, post dyeing, rinsing, and perhaps printing again. I enjoy the relationship with the natural world inherent in the process: foraging walks, growing my own dye plants, the aroma of cooking eucalyptus, and the opening of a bundle to reveal what gift Mother Nature has given. When a piece of printed paper or cloth excites me, I begin the slow process of embellishing. This involves tearing fabric, arranging and rearranging, pinning, basting, and deciding on a place to start. I approach this process intuitively, reacting playfully, exploring this or that, asking what if? The piece evolves and its story unfolds. Hopefully a lovely whole is created by the intricate details. In a nutshell, the beauty of the materials and the process of making are what my artwork is about. I am co-creating with Mother Nature and collaborating with the fabric, yarn, and thread.

Exhibit Date :: November 10, 2022 - January 8, 2023
Opening Reception: Thursday, November 10, 5-8pm
In Gallery & Online
“Art Made with Light: Photograms by Melissa Wilgis” Exhibit

“Mushroom Coral” Cyanotype on paper

Art Made with Light is a new collection of cyanotypes by photographer, Melissa Wilgis. Melissa is a fine art photographer specializing in photograms. Her cyanotypes on silver gelatin are a three-step process that requires thoughtful planning and time spent both in a traditional darkroom and outside under the sun. For this body of work, sea whips gathered from local beaches are combined with seashell x-rays and other collected items to create images that are eye-catching and unique.

Join us in the gallery on Thursday, November 10th from 5-8pm for a special Opening Reception for this body of work! On view along with this exhibit is Collaborating with Nature: Fiber Art by Rebecca Yeomans”.

Click here for a preview of the work that will appear in this exhibit! 

About the Artist

I’m a fine art photographer specializing in photograms.  I made my first photogram in 1986 in Mr. Fecik’s photography class at Boardman High School.  I don’t recall the specifics, but I’m fairly certain a clear cassette tape was involved.  At the time, making photograms was simply a way to learn my way around the darkroom.  It taught me how to use an enlarger and what the various chemicals do.  Leaving photograms behind, I pursued photojournalism throughout high school and college.  After graduating with a BA in English from NC State University, I started working for a branch of Eastman Kodak called Qualex.  I was in tech support, helping one-hour-photo lab operators fix their problems via telephone.  Over the next several years, I moved further away from photography and became further entrenched in corporate America.  I finally came to my senses and left that world.  I found some film photography classes at the local community college and took a few to get back into the swing of things. Soon I started working there as the darkroom assistant.  Four years later I became pregnant with my daughter and left my job at the community college to focus on being a mom.  When my daughter was about a year old, my husband completed the darkroom in our garage.  The baby-monitor picked-up a signal out there, so I was able to go into the darkroom during naptime, in addition to occasional evenings and weekends.  Making photograms gained traction for me during this time because it was photography I could do without wandering too far from my young daughter.  She was and still is my regular, full-time job.

I initially began making photograms using what I refer to as my “critters”; seahorses, crabs, butterflies, dragonflies, sea whips, wildflowers and other found curiosities.  My husband works in marine biology and helps me gather specimens.  No animals are ever harmed—they’re gathered after they’ve passed.  One day my husband came home with a deceased baby stingray.  He had been out in the field and noticed some fishermen getting ready to toss it back.  He asked if he could have the ray and they agreed.  So, the joke now is that it’s all fine and good if your husband brings you flowers.  But it’s exciting if he brings you a dead baby stingray.  Eventually, I knew I needed to expand my photogram creations beyond critters.  I’m a thrift store junky and made it a priority to search out photogrammable objects at the charity shops.  I’m drawn to antique garments, lace, and glass baubles.  My photogram compositions are simple.  This simplicity allows the viewer to find their own story, be it politics, feminism, gender, sexuality, body-image, materialism, culture, economy, history, family or simply nostalgia.  To me, they’re first and foremost, a reminder to always try to see things in a different light.

Exhibit Date :: Ongoing Exhibit
Debra Bucci Paintings at True Blue Butcher & Table Restaurant

Join us in celebrating our partnership between True Blue Butcher & Table Restaurant, Debra Bucci Fine Art and Art in Bloom Gallery!

True Blue, a local restaurant in Wilmington, NC, invited Debra to create and display a collection of her large abstract art in their dining room. The paintings are for sale and can viewed in the restaurant and online.  Preview the work here!

True Blue Butcher and Table Restaurant
1125 Military Cutoff Road, Wilmington, NC 28405